Our Practice


  • Dr.
    David A. Johnson
    O.D.

    Dr. David A. Johnson graduated cum laude from Auburn University at Montgomery with a degree in Physical Science (majored in Biology and Chemistry with minors in Math and English). Dr. Johnson graduated from the University of Alabama-Birmingham School of Optometry in 1986. He and his wife, Deborah, moved to Peachtree City to establish his practice in 1988.

    Dr. Johnson is a member of the American Optometric Association as well as the Georgia Optometric Association. He and his family are members of the Peachtree City United Methodist Church.

  • Dr.
    Nancy S. Barr
    O.D., F.A.A.O. Diplomate, American Board of Optometry

    A graduate of The Ohio State University College of Optometry, Dr. Nancy Barr was in practice with Riverdale Eye Clinic for many years before joining Johnson & Johnson's contact lens division as an industry consultant. Dr. Barr joined EyeCarePlus in 2002.

    Dr. Barr is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry (FAAO) and is a member of the American Optometric Association. She is a past president of the Georgia Optometric Association and was recognized as their Optometrist of the Year in 1997.

    Dr. Barr is the 2014 recipient of the Beacon of Hope award presented by the Georgia Lion's Lighthouse charitable organization.  The Lighthouse provides vision and hearing services to uninsured individuals in need.  Dr. Barr was instrumental in bringing the Lighthouse services to the Fayette Care Clinic to better serve the eye health and vision needs of the under served in Fayette County.  She is also a member of VOSH, Volunteer Optometrists Serving Humanity, and has served on mission trips. 

    Dr. Barr is married to Steve Stubbs, an international captain with Delta Airlines. They live in Peachtree City and have four adult children.

  • Dr.
    Nicole Gurbal
    O.D., FCOVD

    Dr. Gurbal received her Doctor of Optometry degree from The New England College of Optometry and her Bachelor of Science from Florida State University. She completed a post- graduate residency in Pediatrics and Vision Therapy at Southern College of Optometry. During this residency she gained experience working with children, diagnosing and managing common eye disorders found in the pediatric population, and successfully implementing vision therapy programs for both adults and children.

    From a very young age, Dr. Gurbal had always had an interest in the field of optometry. As a young child, she suffered from many reading problems, and it wasn’t until she enrolled in a vision therapy program that she began to realize what her passion in life was. The benefits or vision therapy did wonders for her, and now she is fully committed to providing the service to help strengthen children’s vision as it relates to academics and athletics.

    Dr. Gurbal is an active member of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD), American Optometric Academy (AOA), the Georgia Optometric Association (GOA), and the Optometric Extension Program Foundation (OEP). She is the currently the InfantSEE Chairperson for the state of Georgia. As chairperson, she attended the first InfantSEE Summit meeting in Dallas in 2007. She continues to educate the public about the InfantSEE program by incorporating information about the program in health care clinics throughout Fulton County. It is her goal to expand this knowledge throughout the state.

    In 2008, Dr. Gurbal was honored with the Georgia Young Optometrist of the Year Award. As a developmental optometrist, she continues to expand her knowledge by attending optometric conventions, participating in research, and attending continuing education courses.

    Dr. Gurbal currently resides in Smyrna, Ga, and likes to spend her spare time outdoors with her husband Chris.

  • Dr.
    Ross Montgomery
    O.D.

    Dr. Ross Montgomery graduated from Valdosta State University, Cum Laude with a BS Degree in Biology. In 2013, Dr. Montgomery received his degree of Doctor of Optometry from the PA College of Optometry. Dr. Montgomery completed a residency at the Woolfson Eye Institute in Atlanta where he worked with expert ocular disease specialists. Dr. Montgomery is married to Erica Frederick, a life long resident of Peachtree City who is a graduate of Starr's Mill High School. Dr. Montgomery enjoys fishing, outdoor activities, designing websites and spending time with his wife, family and friends.

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Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 AM

6:00 PM

Tuesday:

8:00 AM

6:00 PM

Wednesday:

9:00 AM

6:00 PM

Thursday:

8:00 AM

6:00 PM

Friday:

8:00 AM

5:00 PM

Saturday:

Closed

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Closed

Location

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Testimonial

  • "I've been going here since 2006. They are very thorough and the staff is always professional."
    Anissa Patton / Peachtree City, GA

Featured Articles

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  • Patches

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